Portland Kenton Women’s Village*

Kenton Women’s Village*

Portland Pod Village Pilot Project

Overview

First developed in 2017, the Kenton Women’s Village recently moved locations within the Portland neighborhood of Kenton, opening in March 2019 with 20 tiny homes.

Context:

  • Launched in 2018 to shelter over 3k people, the Mayor’s A Bridge Home program is designed to be an alternative to encampments

Mission: Provide an alternative to encampments to help move people off the streets, through bridge housing facilities, and into long-term housing.

Site

Owner: The land is owned by the Bureau of Environmental Services and isn’t eligible for commercial development due to its use for sewer lines.

Previous Use: Paved parking lot

Use Arrangement: Master leased to operator via Emergency Housing Operations Agreement

Site Selection Criteria Considerations: N/A

Site Selection Notes

 

  • Project organizers stated that this project wouldn’t move forward without the neighborhood’s support. Hence, the KNA held a neighborhood-wide vote on the project at the General Meeting on March 8th, 2017, where the village was overwhelmingly approved by the neighborhood.
  • Besides reaching out to neighbors, the KNA formed an ad hoc committee based on neighborhood feedback to work with and provide input to the project organizers to further develop the proposal. This committee met multiple times, looking at topics like site planning, good neighbor agreement and village rules.
  • The relocated KWV rolled out in two phases on city-owned land that isn’t eligible for commercial development with work beginning in the fall of 2018. Using the same transitional housing model, the KWV now features 20 micro-housing sleeping pods, 6 or so of which being reused from the original site, and improved community facilities and infrastructure like running water, sewer and electricity.

Funding

 

Upfront Development* $5 million Pod construction was donated. 

Utilities were paid for by the City.

Cost Per Bed* $__k 14 beds in total
Operating Costs* $__ million/year  Funded by the city-county Joint Office of Homeless Services (JOHS), Multnomah County pays for operational expenses, including a contract with Catholic Charities to manage the village and provide social services for the residents. 

 

 

Cost Per Bed* $_k/year $__/bed/night

*approximations

Funding Notes

  • Backing by the city-county Joint Office of Homeless Services.
  • Seven pods from the original village were moved to a new site blocks away with 21 new ones built and donated by local contractors and construction companies.

Additional Funding Notes

  • This year, as part of the State’s Fiscal Year (FY) 2019-20 Budget, the State set aside $650 million in one-time funding for the construction and expansion of emergency shelters and
    navigation centers, rapid rehousing, permanent supportive housing, job programs, and for innovative projects like hotel/motel conversions. The Homeless Housing, Assistance, and
    Prevention Program (HHAPP) will make available $275 million to large cities, with a significant portion going to Los Angeles.
  • Prior state funds for emergency shelters were provided by the 2018-enacted HEAP funding allocations (link).

Development

Lead Deal Coordinator To be completed…
Community Engagement ?
Construction Management ?
Shelter Vendor / Manufacturer Various The tiny homes were built by various contractor companies in early 2019 (listed below).
On-Site Assembly  ?

 

Design Notes

 

  • Community partners: Portland State University’s Center for Public Interest Design (CPID), ReBuilding Center, City Repair, the KNA and Kenton Business Association (KBA)
  • An effort, called the Pod Build Challenge, was organized by the Andersen Construction and the contractor community to donate time and materials to build new pods between February and March, 2019.
  • The relocated KWV rolled out in two phases on city-owned land that isn’t eligible for commercial development with work beginning in the fall of 2018. Using the same transitional housing model, the KWV now features 20 micro-housing sleeping pods, 6 or so of which being reused from the original site, and improved community facilities and infrastructure like running water, sewer and electricity.
  • Installation of electrical hookups at each pod location and buildout of infrastructure needed for Phase 2 under a tight deadline using mostly professional contractors. The best performing pods will be moved from the current location, along with the existing kitchen and bath facilities.
  • Each newly built home has a radiant heating panel, and the row of port-a-potties will soon be swapped for flush toilets.
  • Pods were built by:• Andersen Construction
    • Associated General Contractors Oregon-Columbia Chapter
    • BC Custom Homes
    • Bremik Construction sponsoring Constructing Hope
    • Builders FirstSource
    • DR Horton
    • Legend Homes sponsoring Professional Women in Building
    • LMC Construction
    • O’Neill/Walsh Community Builders
    • P&C Construction
    • R&H Construction
    • The ReBuilding Center
    • Skanska
    • Stephens Homes sponsoring Professional Women in Building
    • Turner Construction Company

Operations

Lead Operators:

 

Operator To date, Catholic Charities’ dedicated housing entity, Caritas Housing, has created more than 800 units of affordable housing for over 1,900 individuals. The organization provides on-site, relationship-centered services with the primary goal of helping residents maintain their housing and thrive as members of our community. 

https://www.catholiccharitiesoregon.org/

Agreement 3-year lease between ___ and ____.
Staffing
  • __ day-shift workers
  • Shelter Manager
  • Program Supervisor
  • Logistic Coordinators
  • Case Managers
  • Security
  • Janitorial
  • Back-end Admin
Management Beyond CC being the administrative and fiscal services provider, the village mostly uses a self-governance model comprised of a general assembly of residents, resident stewards, a staff liaisons from CC, a trained crisis intervention team and a steering committee of JOHS, City of Portland, residents, KNA and CC.
Services Provided
  • Use of a small transitional dwelling
  • Permanent housing placement assistance
  • Shared food storage, preparation, and dining facilities
  • Shared facilities for toilets, sanitation, and hygiene
  • Regular trash collection
  • A mailbox and address
  • Community meetings and social events
  • Conflict resolution, including mediation
  • On-site leadership development and educational programming, including proactive systems for building affinity and collaboration
  • Integrated case management
  • Addiction treatment referrals
  • Mental health treatment referrals
  • Smoking cessation support
Cost
  • ~$__/night operating costs
Operating Expenses
  • On-Site Personnel
  • Maintenance
  • Client Services, meals

 

Operation Notes

 

  • Based on numbers from early 2018, of 24 former and current KWV residents, 14 women have already moved from the village into permanent housing with the assistance of Catholic Charities case managers.
  • The average age of the villagers is 47.5, and the average time they had been homeless is 4.5 years with a range of 1 to 20 years.
  • CC is a nonprofit that has done work with the City of Portland in the past
  • Local preference policy at shelters